B&B Owners, How Loud is Your Marketing Voice?

If you own a Bed and Breakfast establishment, it is important to have a loud marketing voice in these times of high gasoline prices, economic uncertainty, and an unresolved U.S. credit crisis.

If you have not taken the time to give thought to your marketing voice in the past, hesitate no longer. Most innkeepers tend to work with relatively small marketing budgets. A smaller budget might reduce the volume of your marketing voice, but it doesn’t have to reduce its quality. To get your message through with the clarity of a string quartet, start by analyzing what your current message is saying to your potential guests:

  • Does your message tell a potential guest what you have to offer? More times than you might expect, innkeeper messages don’t really say anything at all, at least not anything a potential guest cares about. Cut through the noise by basing your message on what you know about the needs of guests.
  • Does your message say the same thing every time? Consistency is crucial, particularly in noisy, crowded marketing environments. Are your printed materials, online communications and everything else in harmony? If yes, then, resist the urge to change your message just because you’re tired of it — you hear it a thousand times more often than your potential guests. Remember, the goal of your message is to be Recognized, Received and Remembered by potential guests!

The importance of carrying the message to the Internet

Because research has shown that nearly 90% of new inn guests are now coming from the Internet, it critical that all B&B owners have an easy to navigate, informative and visually appealing website.

Last year, I visited a friend’s home in Seattle. And ever since my friend moved to this house, she has bragged about the view from her living room’s large picture window that looks into a massive yard filled with mature trees, striking exotic flowers and lots of wild life that she feeds regularly.

Well, the yard was everything she said, beautiful, peaceful and filled with friendly creatures. Once inside the house, however, she led me to the picture window. The yard remained spectacular, but, you barely noticed it. The inside of the window was dusty and there were fingerprints all over. The outside of the window was a target for bird droppings. It was difficult to ignore the window in order to appreciate the yard.

Your Web site might have much in common with this window. Your visitors come to your Web site to accomplish something — to research, to price your accommodations, or to make a reservation. Your site’s goal should be to become transparent — just like a clean, well-built window.

A window that’s cracked, or dirty, hung too high or too low only calls attention to itself. It doesn’t allow people to see past it and fully appreciate the view.

A Web site that’s inadequately planned and poorly executed, or a mystery to navigate, doesn’t allow visitors to accomplish what they’ve come to do. The site calls attention to itself and not the view it’s offering. Often, visitors will move on to your competition’s site because yours may not be helping them accomplish what they came to do.

A frustrating experience with your Web site tells visitors that they’ll probably have a frustrating experience doing business with you. A clean, efficient site tells visitors that you have a clean, efficient business. Here are some simple rules that will help you create a Web site in harmony with your goal to be Recognized, Received and Remembered by potential guests.

Tell your story on your Web site & in your print brochure
B&B clients that work with TotalWebDesigner.com have seen solid results from the practice of telling an easy to understand story in both their print materials and on the web, so I feel confident in telling you to use the same copy for your brochures and your Web site. You can refer inquiring guests to your Web site for more information on certain subjects appearing in your brochure. This practice creates a seamless link between your print and online communications. Use this step as a catalyst to also link your press releases, and other print materials to your Web site. The possibilities are endless. Here are a few pointers:

  • Always avoid having text that repeats the picture content – it should offer new information or place the picture in a new context.
  • Fast access is vital; research shows that if your site doesn’t load in 20 seconds most people will give up.
  • Content is Critical Provide only the amount of content needed to help your visitor reach their goal. People do not like to read volumes on a Web site. Reading from computer screens is about 25% slower than reading from paper.
  • People don’t want to read a lot of text from computer screens You should write 50% less text and not just 25%. Visitors don’t like to scroll: one more reason to keep pages short.
  • Skimming instead of reading is a fact of the Web It has been confirmed by countless usability studies. Web writers have to acknowledge this fact and write for scan ability.
  • The website must flow your message out when the home page first loads. Links to your rooms and the grounds will draw visitors into the site. Give people all the options to contact you. Be sure every page has a prominent link to a contact page. If you leave off an e-mail address because you do not want spammers to obtain it, then provide a form where a message can be forwarded to your e-mail account.
  • Be Inviting The site needs to be pleasant to look at and easy to navigate. Maintain a consistent look and feel that mirrors your brochure.
  • Provide Support A huge factor in the success of your Web site depends on you answering e-mail inquiries. If visitors send you e-mails and you do not return them in a timely fashion, you have lost a customer.
  • Showcase Your Company, not Your Designer!  Your site is about your inn, your services and/or your products. If your designer does not appear to understand this, find a new designer.
  • Include a Call to Action There is a precise point in the content delivery where you must include a call to action. The objective is to get a prospective guest to contact you for more information so you can realize your goal to have your message Recognized, Received and Remembered.

~Amelia Painter

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